Notes to the e.book edition

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Introduction: The Babysitter Bites Back
1. A notable exception is Duncan Fisher’s self-help focussed book Baby’s Here! Who does what? (2010, Grandma’s Stories)

Chapter 1: The new fatherhood myth
1. Daddy stays at home but mummy has flown the nest, The Telegraph, 26 January 2012
2. Role reversal: Number of women who are family’s main breadwinner soars as husbands left holding the baby, Mail Online, 26 January 2012, http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/ article-2092103/Househusbands-triple-15-years-number-women- familys-main-breadwinner-soars.html (accessed 7 December 2012)
3. Is shared parental leave the best way forward? The Guardian, 18 January 2011, http://www.guardian.co.uk/ commentisfree/2011/jan/18/shared-parental-leave-nick-clegg (accessed 7 December 2012)
4. Wait till your mother gets home, The Observer, 29 January 2012
5. Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
6. Firms hold dads back when it comes to family, BT corporate website, 14 June 2012, http://www.btplc.com/news/articles/showarticle.cfm?articleid=%7Bc66e1862-1b1c-4bbb-8a3d-20fad960e7b6%7D (accessed 7 December 2012)
7. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2008) Working Better: Fathers, family and work – contemporary perspectives
8. Working Families/Lancaster University Management School (2011) Working and fathers: Combining family life and work
9. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011)
10. Stay-at-home dads on the up: one in seven fathers are main childcarers, The Guardian, 25 October 2011
11. The rise of the stay-at-home dad: One in seven families now have
father as primary carer for children, Daily Mail, 25 October 2011
12. Breadwinning wives lead to more househusbands, The Telegraph, 25 January 2012
13. FATHERS are the main child carers in one in seven UK homes, The Sun, 21 December 2011
14. Stay-at-home fathers ‘up 10-fold’, BBC News website, 6 April 2010, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8605824.stm (accessed 7 December 2012)
15. Never mind the numbers, what about the social trend?, BBC – Blogs – College of Journalism website, 8 April 2010, http://www.bbc.co.uk/ blogs/blogcollegeofjournalism/posts/never_mind_the_numbers_ what_ab (accessed 11 December 2012)
16. ‘Modern Day Father’ downs tools for cookbooks and dusters says new survey, Not On The High Street website, 12 June 2012, http:// www.digitalnewsroom.co.uk/noths/modern-day-father/ (accessed 11 December 2012)
17. Figures for men:
In 2002, there were 190,000 men who were classified as ‘economically inactive, looking after the family/home’.(i) In August– October 2012 there were 220,000(ii) – an increase of 30,000 men.
In 2002 there were only 80,000 men not working because they were looking after children (42% of the total); the rest
were looking after disabled relatives or similar.(i) Assuming that proportion hasn’t changed (the ONS no longer separates them out), the number of men looking after children full-time in 2012 will be 92,632.That’s a growth of 12,632 men in a decade.
In 2002 only 39,000 of these 80,000 men were at home looking after children under school age.(i) Assuming the same proportions today, there are 45,158 men looking after children under school age in 2012.That’s 6,158 more men looking after babies and toddlers than there were in 2002.
For the years in between, the figures show a pretty slow but steady growth, albeit a small one in total.
Figures for women:
In 2002, there were 2.199 million women who were classified as ‘economically inactive, looking after the family/home’.(i) In August– October 2012 there were 2.11 million(ii) – a drop of 88,000 women.
In 2002 there were 1.707 million women not working because they were looking after children (78% of the total); the rest were looking after disabled relatives or similar.(i) Assuming
that proportion hasn’t changed, the number of women looking after children full time in 2012 would be 1.639 million.That’s a decrease of 68,311 women in a decade.
In 2002, 1.101 million of these 1.707 million women were at home looking after children under school age. (i) Assuming the same proportions today, there are 1.057 million women looking after children under school age in 2012.That’s drop of 44,060 women looking after babies and toddlers since 2002.
(i) OfficeforNationalStatistics(2002)Theeconomicallyinactive who look after the family or home
(ii) Office for National Statistics (December 2012) Table: INAC01 Economic inactivity: reasons
18. Office for National Statistics (2002)
19. For the record, the 2001 and 2011 national censuses actually show a decrease in the number of men ticking the ‘economically inactive – looking after the family/home’ box over the ten year gap. Four thousand fewer men self-identified as looking after the family/home in the 2011 census. However, the census allows participants to tick any number of boxes for economic inactivity at the same time, rather than asking for a primary reason for not working as the quarterly ONS’s economic activity survey does.The usually vociferous stay- at-home father growing trend journalists seem to have stayed pretty quiet about this particular census result.
20. Office for National Statistics, Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/ashe/annual-survey-of-hours-and- earnings/index.html (accessed 11 December 2012)
21. Office for National Statistics (2004) Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, 2001 Results, All Employees 1.1a Weekly Pay – Gross 2001:
Number of jobs (in ’000s): 21,858
Male full-time: 10,433 (47.73%)
Female full-time: 6,160 (28.18%)
Male part-time: 894 (4.09%)
Female part-time: 4,372 (20.00%)
22. Office for National Statistics (November 2012) Statistical Bulletin: 2012 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings
23. Office for National Statistics (2006) Time Use, 2005 Edition, table 3.1
24. Office for National Statistics (2006) Time Use, 2005 Edition, figure 4.4

Chapter 2: Fathers not visitors
1. Royal College of Midwives (2010) Reaching Out: Involving Fathers in Maternity Care
2. Various benefits of fathers attending births cited in: Royal College of Midwives (2010); FI Research Summary (20 March 2007) Fathers attending births; Fatherhood Institute (2010) The Dad Deficit.
3. Are new dads being left out?, Mother and Baby website, http://www.askamum.co.uk/Family/Search-Results/Being-a-dad/Are-new-dads-being-left-out (accessed 11 December 2012)
4. Royal College of Midwives (2011) Research and Development Action Plan 2011
5. Fathers at birth and beyond, Midwives magazine, 19 July 2012
6. Care Quality Commission (2010) Maternity services survey 2010
7. New mothers will rate midwives and doctors on childbirth care, The Observer, 29 December 2012
8. Scottish Health Council (2011) Good Practice in Service User Involvement in Maternity Services – Involving women to improve their care
9. TNS System Three (2005) NHS Maternity Services Quantitative Research
10. Fatherhood Institute (2011) Family Man: British Fathers’ Journey to the Centre of the Kitchen
11. Burgess, A. & Ruxton, S. (2006) Men and their children: Proposals for public policy, IPPR
12. National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (2010) Delivered with care: a national survey of women’s experience of maternity care 2010

Chapter 3: Why fairer parenting?
1. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010) Fathers’ impact on their children’s learning
2. Flouri, E. (2005) Fathering and Child Outcomes,Wiley & Sons
3. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
4. Cited in: Civitas (2001) How do fathers fit in?
5. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010) Supporting Families and Relationships through Parental Leave
6. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010) Supporting Families and
Relationships through Parental Leave
7. Cited in: National Childbirth Trust (2009) Involving Fathers in Maternity Care
8. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010) Fathers and postnatal depression
9. Burgess, A. (1997) Fatherhood reclaimed: the making of the modern father,
Vermilion
10. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010) Supporting Families and
Relationships through Parental Leave
11. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2009) Meeting the changing needs of families, workers and employees in the 21st century
12. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010) Supporting Families and Relationships through Parental Leave
13. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
14. Office for National Statistics (2010) Labour Market and Family Status of People, and Women with Dependent Children
15. Warren,T. (2003) Class- and Gender-based Working Time? Time Poverty and the Division of Domestic Labour, Sociology
16. Office for National Statistics (2011) 2012 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, table 6.12a, tab: part-time
17. Beal, N. and McGuire, J. (1982) Fathers: Psychological Perspectives, Junction Books
18. Cited in: Civitas (2001) How Do Fathers Fit In?
19. Equal Opportunities Commission (2005) Time Use and Childcare
20. NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre (2012) Infant Feeding Survey 2010: Summary

Chapter 4: ‘Doing babies’
1. NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre (2012)
Infant Feeding Survey 2010: Summary
2. One in ten new parents sleep apart after their baby is born,
Mail Online, 14 May 2011, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ article-1386998/One-new-parents-sleep-baby-born.html (accessed 11 December 2011)
3. Cited in: Royal College of Midwives (2011) Reaching Out: Involving Fathers in Maternity Care
4. Lewis, C. and Warin, J. (2001) What Good Are Dads?, Fathers Direct
5. National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (2010) Delivered with care: a national survey of women’s experience of maternity care 2010

Chapter 5: Choosing to do childcare
1. Various evidence cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010)
Supporting Families and Relationships through Parental Leave
2. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute Research Summary (2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
3. Deutsch, F. (2000) Halving it All: How Equally Shared Parenting Works, Harvard University Press

Chapter 6: Who’s the daddy?
1. A mainstream parenting book that does tackle the father’s role in parenting for the sake of the dad and child, not as some kind of assistant to the mother, is Brott, A. (2005) The New Father: A Dad’s Guide to the First Year, Mitchell Beazley. A non-mainstream UK book which takes shared parenting as a key premise is Fisher, D. (2010) Baby’s Here:Who does what? Grandma’s Stories.
2. That’s how to build a cabinet: David Cameron and Nick Clegg reveal they formed DIY coalition to build new cupboard for baby Florence, Daily Mail, 18 September 2010
3. Yates, C. (2012) Fatherhood, UK political culture and the new politics, Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society Vol. 17
4. Nick Clegg should run the country, not the kids to school, The Telegraph, 13 July 2011
5. Hen-pecked Cleggy should tell his wife that running the country matters more than doing the school run, Daily Mail, 13 July 2011

Chapter 7: Women vs men
1. Fatherhood Institute (2008) The Difference a Dad Makes
2. Lamb, M.E. [ed] (2010) The Role of the Father in Child Development, Wiley
3. Parke, R.D. (1981) Fathering, Fontana/Harvard University Press
4. Lamb, M.E. [ed] (2010)
5. White,Woollett & Lyon, Fathers’ involvement with their infants:
the relevance of holding, in: Fathers: Psychological Perspectives (1982) Junction.
6. Lewis, C. (1986) Becoming a father, Open University Press
7. Various evidence cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2010)
Supporting Families and Relationships through Parental Leave
8. Parke, R.D. (1981)
9. National Childbirth Trust (2011) Postnatal depression – the impact for women and children and interventions to enhance the mother-infant relationship
10. Lamb, M.E. (1977) Father-infant and mother-infant interaction in the first year of life, in: Child Development, 48, Wiley
11. It’s official – housework makes men happier, Independent website, 1 July 2012, http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/ commentators/katy-guest-its-official–housework-makes-men- happier-7901744.html (accessed 12 December 2012)
12. Fathers are happier when doing more housework, Guardian website, 4 November 2010, http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/ nov/04/fathers-happier-more-housework-study (accessed 12 December 2012)
13. Office for National Statistics (2006) Time Use, 2005 Edition
14. Eight out of ten married women do more housework than their husbands, IPPR website, 10 Mar 2012, http://www.ippr.org/press- releases/111/8831/eight-out-of-ten-married-women-do-more- housework-than-their-husbands (accessed 13 December 2012)
15. Equal Opportunities Commission (2005) Time Use and Childcare
16. Cited in:Women will be doing the housework until 2050, Telegraph website, 20 May 2011, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/mother- tongue/8526413/Research-women-will-be-doing-the-housework- until-2050.html (accessed 13 December 2012)
17. Office for National Statistics (2006) Time Use, 2005 Edition, figure 4.4
18. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (2011) Family Man: British Fathers’ Journey to the Centre of the Kitchen
19. Cited in: Secret of a man’s happiness: do the dishes for a quiet
life, Telegraph website, 27 June 2012, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ women/mother-tongue/9356714/Secret-of-a-mans-happiness-do- the-dishes-for-a-quiet-life.html (accessed 13 December 2012)
20. Working Families (2011) Working and Fathers: Combining family life and work

Chapter 8: It’s all work work work
1. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
2. Demos (2011) Reinventing the Workplace
3. Fatherhood Institute (2011) Family Man: British Fathers’ Journey to
the Centre of the Kitchen
4. Fatherhood Institute (2011) Family Man
5. Number of women in cabinet falls, Telegraph website, 4 September 2012, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/9520599/ Number-of-women-in-Cabinet-falls.html (accessed 4
January 2013)

Chapter 9: Doing the sums
1. The ONS recommends using men and women’s hourly pay as the measure of the gender pay gap, because it strips out extra earnings from working longer hours, bonuses and other extras.
2. Office for National Statistics (November 2012) 2012 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, table 6.12a, tab: full-time
3. Gender pay gap ‘at risk of worsening’, say campaigners, BBC News website, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20223264 (accessed 12 December 2012)
4. Higher Education Statistics Agency (September 2012)
HE qualifications obtained by location of HE institution, mode of study, domicile, gender, level of qualification and class of first degree 2010/11, Table 17
5. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
6. On December 2012 tax regime allowances, if both parents
earn £25k a year each, their total after-tax earnings would be £43,242. If one parent earned that £50k by themselves, the total after-tax would be £41,738 – about £1,500 less. If both parents earned £35k a year each, their total take-home would be £59,242, whereas if one parent earned that £70k alone it would be £53,738 – about £5,500 less.That’s a very decent holiday’s worth of difference, every single year. (National Insurance isn’t included in these figures because it’s even more complex, but it actually makes the difference even greater.)

Chapter 10: Flexible fatherhood
1. Office for National Statistics (2006) Time Use, 2005 Edition
2. Office for National Statistics (November 2012) Statistical Bulletin:
2012 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings
3. Office for National Statistics (2008) Focus on Gender
4. TUC (2006) Out of Time:Why Britain Needs a New Approach to Working-time Flexibility
5. Cited in: Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (2008) Right to request flexible working
6. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2009) Fathers, family and work: contemporary perspectives
7. Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (2012) Fourth Work Life Balance Employee Survey,Table C4.2
8. Office for National Statistics (2008) Focus on Gender
9. Various information about flexible working rights at: Flexible working webguide, Working Families website, http://www. workingfamilies.org.uk/articles/parents-and-carers/flexible- working/flexible-working-webguide-step-1-what-to-ask-for (accessed 13 December 2012)
10. Various information about right to paid time off at:Time off for family and dependants, Gov.uk website, https://www.gov.uk/time- off-for-dependants/your-rights (accessed 13 December 2012)
11. Demos (2011) Reinventing the Workplace
12. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2009) Meeting the
changing needs of families, workers and employees in the 21st century
13. Babies in the office:Who’s been sleeping on my spreadsheet?, Telegraph website, 17 July 2012, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/ mother-tongue/9403342/Babies-in-the-office-Whos-been- sleeping-on-my-spreadsheet.html (accessed 13 December 2012)
14. Bringing in baby, The Guardian, 8 April 2008

Chapter 11: Taking care
1. Grandparents Plus (2011) Grandparents, childcare and employment: An analysis of British Social Attitudes Survey Data from 1998 and 2009
2. Number of grandmothers: 1.4 million according to Grandparents Plus (2011); number of stay at home dads: 92,632 (see Chapter 1, footnote 17); number of fathers who do the majority of childcare, according to Aviva: 784,000 (see Chapter 1, footnotes 10 – 14).
3. Future Foundation (2012) Division of responsibility in the home (slide presentation)

Chapter 12: Making work work
1. Department for Education (2010) Think Fathers: How flexible working for Dads can work for your business
2. Equality and Human Rights Commission (2009) Meeting the changing needs of families, workers and employees in the 21st century
3. Drastic action, as well as statements of principle, needed to restore confidence, Institute of Directors website, 9 May 2012, http://www. iod.com/Influencing/Press-Office/Press-releases/IoD-reaction-to-Queens- Speech-9-May-2012 (accessed 13 December 2012)
4. CBI comments: government consultation on parental leave and flexible working, CBI website, 16 May 2012,http://www.cbi. org.uk/media-centre/press-releases/2011/05/cbi-comments- government-consultation-on-parental-leave-and-flexible-working/ (accessed 13 December 2012)
5. Cited in: Fatherhood Institute (19 January 2011) Fathers, mothers, work and family
6. Working Families/Lancaster University Management School (2011) Working and fathers: Combining family life and work